How do you maximise your ability?

John Titchen's Blog - 7 hours 21 min ago

How do you maximise your ability?

This isn’t about training hours, training intensity, supplementary mobility or strength training, diet or sleep.

Paying attention to those will have a huge impact.

It’s not the size of the toolbox.

Most people realise that collecting tools does not necessarily make you an able, efficient or skilful tool user. A small number of tools can do the majority of jobs. You do need more than just a hammer otherwise everything will get treated like a nail.

It’s not about having high quality reliable tools.

Actually it is, but that’s not what I’m thinking about right now. Those are the type of tools you should aim to have and be proficient in using.

It’s about having tools that work together.

To stretch the analogy a little further, there are disadvantages in having one brand of cordless drill, jigsaw and other tools if the only charger and battery you own is incompatible.
The analogy only stretches so far. When it comes to combative techniques, they are all designed with human beings in mind (allegedly). But it is the case that some tactics fit together and feed into each other as redundancies in failure cascade and some don’t. It is also the case that if you have too many responses to the same stimuli (too many tools), as opposed to a limited number of tools that can handle multiple stimuli, then your reaction time will suffer as the brain has too many options from which to choose – unless of course your response is predetermined, but that then begs the question why you trained so many other options in the first place.

The answer to that question is simple. You need exposure to a number of options to discover which is the best ‘go to’ fit for you. If you intend to teach you need to understand those options so you can offer your students the same choices. But when you train yourself? When you train you should focus the majority of your time on the things that are the best fit for you. This is not to limit your repertoire: it’s to increase your effectiveness and your skill level.

“A skill is the learned ability to bring about pre-determined results with maximum certainty; often with the minimum outlay of time or energy or both.”

Barbara Knapp, 1963

As a result you do need to apply analysis and selection or pruning when it comes to how you build your personal training repertoire (or your syllabus). This does not mean that you shouldn’t cross train and expand your horizons to the ideas of different instructors or different arts, far from it because that often provides invaluable insights into movements you already train – allowing you to use a single tool for more than one purpose. It does not mean that grappling is one thing, striking another, and never the two shall meet. It does mean that you should think critically about what you are seeing, learning or drilling, and make an informed decision as to whether it should be rejected, added to your repertoire, or replace something else in your repertoire.

Bolt-on elements added as an afterthought are not going to work as well as stripping something down and rebuilding to incorporate the new element – if it is compatible. If it isn’t compatible then it most likely won’t work in an unpredictable environment because you can’t integrate it with everything else. You may go to a martial arts seminar and find nothing compatible, but if you’ve had a fun day of exercise and exposure to new ideas that have made you see your own practice in a new light, then I would not regard that as a loss. While many karate instructors on the international seminar circuit might appear to be teaching drills, we are usually just using the drills to teach principles – so it does not matter if you ‘don’t do that kata’, there will be something for you to take away if you take the time to analyse it.

This is not a suggestion that you should embark on a ruthless purge of your repertoire. It is a suggestion that you should think about how and why you are doing everything that you are currently doing, whether the movements fit together (in multiple ways), and whether you should make any changes. There’s nothing wrong with occasionally doing something ‘for fun’ if you are aware that it is simply that (and has no practical combative use or combat sports use whatsoever). But your core training repertoire should have integrity.

 

The Brown Belt Mentality

John Titchen's Blog - Wed, 2018-04-11 16:20

 

Anyone involved in the martial arts who uses social media will no doubt have seen many different memes purporting to inform them what a black belt is, and what a black belt isn’t.

Some of these are apt, others simply amusing or ignorant. I once saw a group of people whom I’ve taught in a meme that compared them with another group of black belts. “There are black belts and there are black belts!”it proclaimed proudly. As the group I trained with surrounded a former army full contact champion still training and teaching at a very senior age, and was made up of instructors who regularly gave up their evenings and weekends to teach and train on top of their normal occupations, people who had competed or coached competitors to good levels in their chosen discipline and who also had the guts to take part in my scenario training, I had no doubt who to me represented the spirit and technical ability I rate.

But this isn’t about black belts, it’s about brown belts, or is it?

I can remember I had my brown belt for about two years. Although my association at the time had multiple stages of brown belt, I chose to simply add and remove coloured tabs with each grading rather than buy a new belt. Although I was focused on achieving my black belt, when the time came to retire that belt I was actually very attached to it: we’d been through a good deal together and I’d worn it longer than any belt I’d had up to that time.

Watch out for the brown belts. They’ve trained long enough to have a reasonable amount of power and skill, but not so long as to have the control and timing of the Dan grades. That’s a combination that can lead to painful mistakes.

One of the characteristics of brown belts is that they know they aren’t black belts yet. Does that seem a little obvious? Let me explain.

As a brown belt the symbol, status or ability of the black belt remains a goal. The brown belt itself is a constant reminder that although you’ve done well to ‘hang in there’, there is still work to be done, things to be learned, things to be refined. That’s not a bad thing. The brown belt may be confident, cocky even, but there is ‘in the belt’ the constant reminder that they’re not ‘there’ yet.

There is a quality of seeking refinement and new knowledge in brown belts that often Dan grades seem to lose. Casting aside those black belts who quit on reaching the goal they (or their parents) set, it’s easy for many to get trapped into simply repeating the same training year over and over again; gaining longevity but not necessarily increased experience, knowledge or skill.

So what makes a black belt?

The brown belt mentality.

Perceptions of Karate?

John Titchen's Blog - Mon, 2018-03-26 15:02

“Hi, I’m calling about a karate class for self defence, the Leisure Centre gave me this number, it’s for my nephew.”

“Can I ask how old your nephew is? The youngest I teach are thirteen years old.”

“Oh, he’s four.”

Sigh.

Despite my websites giving my minimum ages in several places, and having no photos of any pre-school children on any of my media, this type of enquiry regarding 4-6 year olds is the most common I get. If they are pre-school I tell them that I’m sorry but there is nobody I can recommend. If they are of primary school age I refer them to the local Judo group where I think the games and the contact will be good for the children (and I know they run a good youth programme).

Often my suggestion of Judo is rejected. They want their barely-shoe-tying offspring to learn self defence (or so they claim), or maybe have someone else instil discipline, self-control, and respect for elders, but they don’t like the idea that there might be contact or rough play. No, Karate or TKD (I also get asked if I know of any TKD clubs) are much safer options. No contact but happy smiling children marching obediently in silence to the command of an adult, or so the pictures seem to show. Every tired parent’s dream?

I should let this go. I should not get annoyed about the fact that karate is predominantly perceived as a crèche activity for children, or a safe no-contact form of exercise for parents and children to do side by side, because that probably does reflect the vast majority of karate available. Because I’m wearing the same uniform and using the same name I will naturally be placed in the same category.

With so much choice these days, advertising and the perception of keyboard warriors rule. Those who want to ‘fight’ or physically compete against others are drawn to Mixed Martial Arts, Muay Thai or Brazilian Ju Jitsu gyms or perhaps Boxing. All of which are disciplines visibly proven in their competitive arena. Others (especially those enrolled by their parents) might go towards Judo if they like competition and rough and tumble element but with perhaps more of the discipline aesthetic. Krav Maga tends to dominate the self defence market because of the gung-ho nature of its advertising.

White Dogi styles like Karate, Ju Jitsu and TKD don’t always train in their uniforms.

The intake of your average karate class now, whatever the type of karate (sport, classical, traditional, practical, children’s, crèche, functional, applied, modern, combat…), is now subtly different to that perhaps of the first forty years of karate in the west. Now we seem to have a higher proportion of people that either come purely for the stimulation of a different form of exercise, or who like the idea of studying self defence but are put off by actual violence (although some people do choose based on proximity or recommendations as people do arrive ‘up for it’). Is this a bad thing? I don’t know. From my perspective I feel that the people who come to me are the ones I can help the most if they were too timid to try more overtly aggressive combat sports, but then they could just as easily have gone to a karate club that is, from my perspective, simply teaching them children’s exercises, and not learned there anything that might have helped them avoid, de-escalate or escape from real aggression and violence.

The majority of self defence isn’t physical training.

But how is that different from any of the other disciplines that they could have chosen? I’m not going to point a finger at any single art other than my own because I think all martial arts, in differing ways, suffer from the same issue of a huge diversity in club quality, approach and understanding.

I’ve seen a lot of different systems. I’ve seen a lot of different clubs. The good, the bad and the ugly; the deluded, the fantasists and the charlatans; the cults, the cocks and the c**ts. There’s a lot of interesting stuff out there. It’s no wonder Master Ken’s spoof of the martial arts community is so popular.

Seems Legit.

There is something for everyone out there, but if you want to find something that’s right for your needs you need to ask a lot of questions about what you really want to achieve, and be prepared to search for people who give you comprehensible explanations for what they are offering. There is nothing wrong with martial arts as a form of exercise, or as a crèche, so long as the instructor delivers that. When it boils down to it that’s how simple it is. Look past the style labels, look at clubs, talk to instructors, watch a class, talk to the students, talk to the parents, ask to see credentials and insurance, and then make an informed choice – you’re more likely to get what you want.

Multiple assailants, combative distance and escape

John Titchen's Blog - Mon, 2018-03-05 08:05

In any unsolicited violent or aggressive event our primary aim is to remove ourselves (and others if we feel responsible for them) from danger of bodily harm. The aim is not to ‘win a fight’ for this is not consensual violence; in most cases therefore (excluding for example threats on the doorstep of our own property) we are endeavouring to create an exit.

There are different means by which different groups of instructors approach this, particularly in the case of multiple threats or assailants. To a large extent the approaches they advocate will be coloured by their own training or personal experience and the nature of experience within the circles with whom they associate and study. A significant determining factor in the viewpoint of that circle will be the main training methodology employed, for you get good at what you train for (and base your conclusions on how it has worked), and the environments in which they have had to utilise such tactics.

To escape from a situation we need space to run/barge or walk through, created by the absence or inability/disinclination of prior threats to engage or stop us.

If there is no current attack (i.e. no-one is currently holding or trying to hit you) then you have space and can exit. If an attack is in process (in other words someone is currently holding you, hitting you, both of those, or standing so close and posing a direct threat of attack and an obstruction to escape) then you have to deal with that in order to exit.

Space is created by the freedom to move, which in turn is created by the sufficient removal of the threat of grabbing/striking/ and potentially chasing.

So now this boils down to the manner of engagement. How you make that space to escape and crucially how to reduce the risk of being attacked by others while you do so.

Space to escape in conflict is created by knocking another person back or down in a manner that they cannot easily resume the fight or block the exit or give chase. It is the desired end result, but not necessarily the starting or mid position.

The majority of non-consensual violent situations where you have to strike a person to make an exit will start close, the proximity being the key factor to determine both the use of force and the blocking of your escape routes. As a result most initial engagements will initiate with close range tactics. You will therefore predominantly initially engage at close range. This is not something that you are likely to be able to choose – the first person you engage with is almost certainly going to be at close quarters to you.

If you are lucky and you act first and you land a good strike (because you have trained to hit pads hard and you have fewer psychological barriers/inhibitions because you have also hit people in training rather than just pads), then you may have created the opportunity and space/time to escape. This might be because there was only one threat, or it might be because the other threats are too far away to impede your escape, both in terms of distance and in terms of time. Time and reaction time are huge factors.

It is no surprise that the person who waits to act is at a disadvantage. When a person acts and moves decisively others (whether hit by them or not) have to react to them. This is frequently seen in physical immobility in my Sim Days (and CCTV or mobile phone footage) – you can literally see on the feedback videos the OO of the OODA loop (Observe Orientate Decide Act) – while the person with the initiative seems to be constantly in DA – other people stand like statues for seconds as the action moves past them, unaware of how much time is passing (something often missing from regular training drills because the expectation of the other persons actions is greater). This has proved true even when I have given people in scenario simulations what seem to be overwhelming odds against them – a lot of the people aren’t in the situation at the same time because they are playing catch up. They aren’t being nice and taking turns, they are trying to catch up with what is happening.

But what if having engaged the first person (at the probable close range that prompted the need for action) there are other threats moving to engage (because you have not dropped that person in a time span quicker than their orientation and decision to act), or other threats so close that they have to be engaged to clear your escape?

This presents two potential types of situation.

1. You are currently still engaged at close range with one person (the first person you tried to go past/through who initiated the escape attempt through their physical and verbal actions), and others are trying to get to you. You are therefore trying to finish one close range engagement while others are moving to hit you or actively trying to hit you. You are fighting close range. You have no distance. This may only last a second before that person falls back and makes space, but you are still proximate to them.

2. You have just got past one person (or knocked them far enough away from you to present an immediate threat) and now you are either about to strike another person (or are on the receiving end of a strike from another person) with potentially further people about to engage. It is the starting position of that other person, the speed of the other person’s movement towards you and their speed of reorientation to your actions that determines their proximity (distance) and thus your tactics. As a result in this situation you will either
a) have close proximity forced upon you – you are fighting close range again, or
b) you move into them (potentially with a bridging distance tactic like a kick or a superman punch) to hit them to clear your escape route – you are fighting long range briefly for that moment if it creates an escape route. If it does not, and they do not fall back at all, you will end up closing and creating that escape space in a flurry or strikes at close range, or you may have space (if they have been knocked back but still pose a threat impediment to actual escape) to strike with a long range tactic again. All the time trying to create space to exit safely.

Three very important dynamics immediately present themselves from what I have described above. The first is that continuous movement is key – other people have to be reacting to you; if you wait or get held up then you can get swarmed regardless of whether you are trying to keep people at a leg’s length or you are touching them. The second is that this isn’t chess – this is all happening in a few chaotic seconds (as you hopefully access your training), and people take time to observe orientate decide and act on your movements. The third is that close range is likely to be forced upon you at some point in time unless you make the decision to hit very early to make an escape route – and that is something rare indeed.

So there are long range engagement options and short range options, but is one best for training and is one more appropriate?

To state the obvious, you get good at what you train for. If you predominantly train a close range repertoire but then ‘bolt on’ a long range approach ‘in case of multiples’ then your bolt on is likely to snap off under pressure. You will work best at what you predominantly train to do. If you predominantly train a long range repertoire, then once the combative space for that is created that will give you the optimum results. People will generally advise what has worked for them and what has worked for them will often be determined by what they have predominantly trained. What they advise is also determined by their memory of events and their interpretation of events.

At all the times the aim is to knock back/drop a person or persons as quickly as possible so that you can take the first opportunity to escape. You are trying to exit. You are not planning to try and take on every threat one at a time.

While you are engaged at close range you can get grabbed by the person you are hitting, but you also have the ability to hit them very hard (just as with longer range hits). If you know how to hit in combinations with redundancies this should not be a protracted event – it should be over and space to escape created before others can orientate to you. An advantage of this temporary position is that the close proximity of the other person closes off more angles of attack by others orientating towards you – often they have to try and flank rather than move in directly and that gives precious moments to finish and exit. Fighting at close range does not mean you are static – it just means you stay close to someone while you are hitting them, they may be falling back with you moving forward throughout that. A disadvantage of being close to someone is that should all your hits be unsuccessful and you get tied up holding or clinching with the other person for a few seconds, then your back is vulnerable to being grabbed by those chasing after you.

While you are engaged at a longer range you have a greater ability to employ your arms and legs to strike at any angle. You are freer to move than at close quarters because you are not moving the body of another person with you as you hit. At the same time you are more open to direct attack from every angle by other people precisely because of your ‘distance’. The distance also creates a greater reactionary gap for other people to avoid your defensive exit-attempting strikes, thus potentially prolonging an event and lowering your odds of escape. If you are close enough to punch someone then they are also close enough to grab you, so unless you plan to exit a situation in a whirlwind of kicks the idea that grabbing is just a close range danger is misguided.

I advocate using close range tactics to create the distance I need to make an escape. That’s partly because I feel most comfortable with my ability to successfully and safely eliminate a threat at that proximity, it’s partly because that is where I expect to find myself in the first place, and it’s partly where I expect to be if I fail to remove the initial obstacle as quickly as I would like. It is also related to the fact that the majority of my training is focused on close range habitual acts of violence (HAOV). This focus is not going to stop me pushing or throwing a front kick or a low shin kick if I have to get past a second person and they happen to be that far away, because I also train to use those tactics. I weight my training for what I believe are the most probable things, multiple person events being less likely than single person events (both in general and in accordance with my lifestyle).

The truth is that the distinction between long range and short range tactics in a multiple person encounter is an illusion, and the idea that you get to choose your tactics (or maintain a distance/range) is largely an illusion too, a case of the brain reconstructing events favourably after an event. An event may seem like an eternity but it is actually seconds, seconds in which many people will be standing still as they try to process what is happening through an adrenal fog. The range you engage ‘the first person’ will be the range at which you have decided to ‘go’. It is highly probable that that will be close range. If you have then made the space to escape then you will do so. If you do not, if there is an impediment, then you will attempt to engage that impediment at the range it presents in order to escape.

Train hard, try it, and remember that contact (and surprise) changes everything – make sure you mimic its effects.

テレクラのバイトがオススメな理由と働くメリットについて

Kris Wilder's Martial Secrets - Thu, 2018-03-01 10:37

バイトには色々ありますが、テレクラのバイトを始めたら、もう他のバイトなんて出来ません。コンビニなどの一般的なバイトはもちろんのこと、キャバクラやカウンターレディーをするのであれば、絶対にテレクラがオススメです。

女の子の立場として、一番重要なポイントが“安全性”。どんなに高額な給料のバイトでも、自分の身体が危険にさらされるようであれば、その価値はないでしょう。

キャバクラは、お客さんが目の前にいるため、時には身体を触られてしまったり……といったことがあるかもしれません。その上、嫌な相手であっても、時間が来るまではニコニコしながら、話をしなければなりません。

お酒を飲む席にいるわけですから、当然酔った相手を楽しませなければなりません。酔って気が大きくなったお客さんに、無茶なことを言われたりするとこれが結構辛い……。

足や胸などを触られても、怒ったりすることは難しい。そして、待機時間は給料カットなんてことまであります。せっかく店に出勤していても、お客さんがいなければ、その分の給料は発生しません。

時間のかけたメイクや選んだ衣装が台無し。これらのデメリットが、テレクラでは一切ないんです!何せ、相手は電話の向こうですから、出来ることなんて限られています。伝わるのは、声だけ。

安全性はかなり高いバイトです。そんな安全の確保されたバイトで給料がいい。テレクラは男性は有料で女性は無料。こちらも電話をかけて、男性と話をすることによって給料が発生します。

しかし、給料は分刻みで少しの無駄もありません。顔の見えない相手とおじゃべりを楽しむだけなので、気軽に出来ますし、話せば話すだけ自分の給料がどんどん増えていきます。

あまり話さない相手だったり、聞かれたくない質問ばかりぶつけてくる嫌な相手が電話に出た場合は、別の相手にかけ直すことだって出来ます。

キャバクラなどでは絶対に出来ないお客さんのチェンが、テレクラでは出来るんです。相手と話すだけでこんなに貰えるの!?最初は本当に驚きました。

今では、お給料日が楽しみです。

クレジットカード現金化の仕組みを知っておこう!

Kris Wilder's Martial Secrets - Thu, 2018-03-01 10:31

生活費って全てがクレジットカードで対応できるというわけではないので職を失ってしまった場合なども困りますよね。出費が多くて支払いが足りない・・というような場合も新しく借金をしてしまうよりは、クレジットカードの空いている枠を現金化していただく方が、安心して支払いをする事ができますよね。

借金をすると借入履歴が残ってしまいますから、クレジットカードのキャッシング枠も利用したくないという方もいらっしゃると思います。

クレジットカード会社は、ショッピングの利用ではなくキャッシングの利用をチェックポイントとしているので、キャッシングをする額が大きくなればなるほど、目を付けられてしまうということにも繋がります。

付帯されているキャッシングではなく、ショッピング枠を生かして現金化する事ができるというサービスが注目されるようになっていますが、違法性があるという事を気にして利用していない方もいらっしゃるんじゃないでしょうか。

安心して取引できる業者なら、カード会社に換金を目的とした利用を疑われることもありませんので、不安に思うこと・気になることなどがあれば、優良業者に問い合わせてみると解決するんじゃないかと思います。

■【クレジットカード現金化】クレカ現金化についてのそもそもの話を紹介しています。
■安全優良クレジットカード現金化業者比較口コミMAP
■URL:https://genkinka-map.net/

当たる電話占い師との相談においても冷静な判断ができるようにしておきましょう

Kris Wilder's Martial Secrets - Thu, 2018-03-01 10:28

電話占いが人気を集めていますが、最近は電話越しに透視ができる占い師もいるようで、相談者の姿や部屋のこと、その人を取り巻く関係者などが鮮明に見えるという占い師がいます。

具体的なアドバイスが欲しいときは、このような高い能力を持つ占い師を選んでいただきたいと思うのですが、知られたくないことまでも知られてしまうということは覚悟しておかなければなりませんね。

透視というのは、霊的な能力の一種なのですが、過去・現在だけではなく、未来までも見えていますので、こういう占い師に鑑定してもらう場合は、将来どうなるかという事もハッキリ伝えるらしいので、冷静に受け入れるようにしましょう。

私は以前、このような能力がある占い師に、鑑定してもらった事がありますが、経営している会社が数年後に倒産すると言われながらも、笑って聞き流していました。

その頃は占いを信じておらず、どうすればいいかという改善方法なども伝授していただいたにもかかわらず、全く無視してしまったので占い師が言う通りの事態となってしまったのです。

あの時こうしていれば・・という後悔にならないためにも、何かを始める前は、占い師に相談してみるのもいいと思います。自分にとっていい時期などもあるようですから、そういうアドバイスをもらって安定した生活に導いてもらうのが一番ですね。

■【ヴェルニ 口コミ】電話占いサイトヴェルニの口コミを確認しよう!
■電話占いヴェルニで当たる先生は?ヴェルニの占い師口コミ評判ランキング
■URL:https://www.denwauranaichan.com/vernis/

The problems of Self Protection & Self Defence

John Titchen's Blog - Mon, 2018-01-22 12:42

In my last blog post, terms and terminology, I drew a distinction between self defence, as the physical aspect of using force to protect yourself or others, and self protection; the broader umbrella comprising the more important aspects of crime prevention through personal safety awareness, avoidance, deterrence, threat negation (running away, de-escalation through language and body language), physical control (where necessary and appropriate) and finally self defence.

The observation was that what a lot of people actually need is self protection, but people don’t look for what they don’t know they need, so they search for self defence rather than personal safety training or self protection. As most martial arts clubs advertise themselves as teaching self defence, and only deliver physical training, is the end result that most people who start training with a martial arts club don’t really get what they need? Rather than improving their ability to avoid or deescalate situations they end up with fighting skills of varying quality and efficacy? Does this make people less safe?

Well, yes and no, for various reasons.

At risk of generalising, what most people joining martial arts clubs actually need is not the ability to avoid or escape violence, it’s better physical (and mental) health. From that perspective the fact that the vast majority of clubs are offering little more than aerobic activity that gives a safe outlet for aggression and has the potential to improve balance, flexibility and coordination is not necessarily an issue.

A second factor that we need to consider is that the need for personal safety skills does vary widely. The rougher the neighbourhood in which you work / live or traverse the more likely it is that you require such skills. At the same time though, those who have grown up in such environments are less likely to require any formal training as these are likely to have come with the territory. It is those who have had the benefit of living or growing up in non-violent environments who find themselves coming into social encounters (or environments) where violence is normalised that have a greater need of advice.

The element of training from which most people could benefit, regardless of background, is in their communication skills to de-escalate aggression; the verbal element of conflict management. This is not likely something that you will find in a martial arts class and is a topic that a lot of ‘specialist’ self defence providers ignore completely. It is however a limited skill set in some regards. It is limited because in the cases where good practise works, the situation would most likely have been resolved verbally with no training, and in situations where it does not, violence was probably unavoidable. It can make a significant difference in a very small number of instances, and given that it is awkward and time consuming to practice, and the odds on being in situations where it would benefit are so low, it is not surprising that it is often omitted. But improving communication skills can have benefits to so many areas of life that the ‘minority effect’ in Conflict Management may simply be a bonus.

The same ‘limited relevance’ could be said for training in the conflict management aspect of control and compliance techniques. Sometimes you may want to control or detain a person, or reduce the risk of harm to them, others, or yourself. But what are used are predominantly compliance techniques, often pain compliance techniques, and they do come with risks (positional asphyxiation in many holds for the person being held, vulnerability to external attack for the person holding). If the person is non compliant to the pain then one person is not going to be able to hold them in the majority of cases. While many ‘holds’ can become ‘breaks’ or ‘tears’ in the instance of non compliance, that can actually escalate the later consequences of the altercation for both holder and held. Controls are useful skills that have a time, a place, and a context.

Are the fighting skills taught by so many martial arts clubs a problem because they mean people associate conflict resolution with fighting and are more likely to resort to violence in situations that might otherwise have been resolved? I would argue that the association is not so much the problem of the martial arts as the external perception that conflict can (or should) be resolved by consensual shows of force or premeditated revenge rather than dialogue. I would also argue that those who take such a creed are likely to be the problem causers rather than the ones seeking training for self defence, and those who look to violence to resolve disputes are more likely to do so because of its social acceptability in their upbringing rather than as a result of the ethos of any martial arts club or any movie culture. While there is an argument that you can only use the tools in your toolbox, the martial arts do not have a monopoly on the tools of common sense, courtesy or self discipline.

Is the teaching of fighting skills as self defence a problem? Isn’t self defence a legal construct rather than fighting skills? Well yes and no. Self defence isn’t a fixed item. What qualifies as self defence varies according to circumstances and a person’s perception of them, and of course from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. It’s therefore not easy to say that this part of this system is self defence while this part is not, it’s not always that clear cut. There are some fighting skills I’ve seen taught that cannot be self defence because they are designed to maim or kill a person when they are no longer in a position where anyone could reasonably claim that they believed they still had the potential to do harm. Teaching those techniques and leading students to believe that they are self defence is a problem, and it is one that is prevalent in the RBSD community as well as in Traditional Martial Arts. Teaching people ‘fighting’ techniques that are quite simply fantastical in the context of application in non-consensual violence is also an issue that is prevalent in both RBSD and TMA.

Ultimately the problem with the martial arts (and the self defence community as a whole) is an underlying lack of knowledge amongst many of its instructors at all levels and across multiple disciplines. I can remember a number of years ago a few people I knew being blown away by the content of a newly released book on self protection. I was very surprised at the time because while it was (and remains) an exceptionally good text, its contents were not new (to the market) and these were people I regarded as fairly knowledgeable. There were already a number of great well-researched books on the subject out there, many of which covered some areas in a superior fashion. I’ve seen similar reactions from people on their first experience of training with a different coach. The point perhaps being that if you are in a dark room any fresh light will catch your eye and make a big impact, but if the room is already filled with lights a new one is less noticeable.

The onus is on martial arts instructors to fill their rooms with light by exposing themselves to information from multiple sources (books, videos, blogs, articles, personal research and seminars) so that they are in a position to give good advice or make reading recommendations to supplement their students’ physical training, and of course are themselves informed enough to construct appropriate physical training. There is a tendency within the martial arts community to mock people who talk more than train, and of course training is important, but our training has more value when supported by good reading habits, sound research, and information exchanging conversations.

Personal experience is not enough. Whether you have been unfortunate enough to have involvement in one or two altercations, or whether through professional employment you have had to participate in hundreds of violent incidents, your experience is always limited by your personal perspective and the context in which those events took place – especially if it was a professional context. Every instructor should take the opportunity to engage in research and take on board the experiences of hundreds of other people.

How do we get to a point where more people are offering good advice and training? The books are out there, the blogs are out there, the videos are out there, and there are some top-notch instructors delivering appropriate physical training underpinned by that information. The more in depth material isn’t shared all that often because people seem to prefer to share gifs and short clips of fights or cool or fantastical technique clips. The chicken nuggets ‘sell’ whereas the more nutritional, longer prepared, tastier high quality meals get ignored. The onus is on each of us to share more of the articles and the longer video clips that are out there, to try and get people more accustomed to focusing on detailed information rather than thirty-second clips. Dumbing down to reach the lowest common denominator has not raised the overall standard, and it never will. It’s time to make a conscious decision to raise the bar.

1対1で連絡が取れるようになってからが本番

Kris Wilder's Martial Secrets - Thu, 2018-01-11 05:57

恋愛とか結婚を意識する方は、出会いの場にも足を運んでいると思うんですが、ルックスが勝負になるような合コンなどは、ルックスがよくない人にとっては単なる引き立て役にしかなりませんよね。

できるだけいい男は集めないようにしよう・・となると、来てくれた女性はテンションも上がらず、お葬式のような飲み会になってしまうこともあります。

自分が気になる異性に声をかけることができるようになるには、やはり自信が必要です。自分に自信がなければ積極的になることはできませんから、どんなに出会いの場に出向いても、自信がない人はチャンスを逃してしまうだけで終わってしまうのです。

男性と女性が数名集まってお酒を飲む・・すごくいい出会いになりそうな気はするのですが、恋愛に発展する男女は結構少ないですよね。

どうせお金を払うなら、女性と一対一でメールをすることができる出会い系を利用したほうがいいと思いませんか?私は彼女がいないときは、出会い系で探しています。

同じ目的の人を探すことがでいるというのも魅力ですが、女性は真剣な出会いを求めていることが多いので、恋愛するための近道になると思うんです。

いい出会いがあるかないかは、相手への理想なども関係してくると思いますが、エッチ目的でなければ、大抵の方はいい出会いに恵まれると思います。

Terms and terminology

John Titchen's Blog - Wed, 2018-01-10 14:03


The other day a respected friend of mine made an observation about the number of clubs, particularly the pyjama dancers (as I call them), advertising that they were teaching self defence, when at best all they were doing was giving their students fighting skills.

It’s not an uncommon gripe amongst the instructors I train and talk with, both here in the UK and abroad. They know that when people are looking for ‘self defence’, actually the majority of what they really need isn’t physical skills; it’s greater knowledge to help them avoid, deter or de-escalate situations and the attributes to help them deal not only with events but their aftermath. These are things that are hard to find in most martial arts or RBSD syllabi, even harder to find taught well, and of course difficult to fit into an activity which for many is their main form of physical exercise – they expect physical training.


So are these people being conned when they believe they are learning self defence?

This does beg the question whether avoidance, deterrence, de-escalation and physical controls are actually self defence or related skill sets.

Your linguistic umbrellas may not be the same as those used by others.

If you use physical force to cause harm to another person and you have to justify it to either avoid charges regarding to the use of force, or to defend yourself against such charges, then you would claim ‘self defence’. The legal basis for this does vary from country to country, and anyone claiming to teach self defence should be aware of their own localities laws and be able to provide or direct students towards advice (which in turn should frame the physical training). As an example, although I provide information in my syllabi, I also direct my England-based students here.

I label what I teach under the broad brush of self protection, which for me includes personal safety (avoidance/deterrence), conflict management (verbal strategies and physical controls), and self defence (employment of fighting skills). After all, if I have to justify the use of force in a Police interview or Court of Law I will do so claiming self defence based on my honest belief as to the threat posed.

Since self defence is the term by which the justifiable use of force is known, and the most common lay terminology, it is also the term that you are most likely to see people (accurately) using to describe the physical skills they (maybe far less accurately or delusionary) believe are appropriate for dealing with people attempting to hurt them. As the majority of tested techniques are used in combative sports, these are also likely to be ‘fighting skills’.

So from a different perspective fighting skills are actually the main part of self defence, but self defence is really just a small part of self protection, and what most people looking for self defence really need is advice on personal safety and conflict management for the prevention of crime.

Does this solve the problem of the representation of self defence? People aren’t going to look for what they don’t know they need, they will search for what they believe they need. That’s why the use of the term self defence is still important.

 


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