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shotokanman70
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Opening of Nijushiho: Preemptive Strike, Clinch and Choke

In this video, I explore the opening sequence of Nijushiho. I first use an entry I learned at a Randy King seminar which fits nicely for the 'pressing block'. Capitalizing on enemy's pain withdraw reflex, the pressing block is used again to pull the enemy off balance. Once the head is more accessible, the punch is used as a bicep bump as the left hand secures the head and serves as a means to index. From there, the left 'elbow strike' is used to pull a guillotine choke tight.

Cheers,

Andy Allen

appliedshotokan.com

Marc
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Nice!

A good application that fits the moves, and very well presented as always. Thanks for sharing.

All the best,

Marc

shotokanman70
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Thanks, Marc. This was a fun one to make.

Iain Abernethy
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Nice stuff explained really well! I like it!

All the best,

Iain

Tau
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I appreciate this is Nijushiho rather than Niseishi. I'm familiar more with the latter. It seems to me that the transitions are more smooth in Nijushiho which might or might not be down to example performance here. When it comes to pre-emption in this kata I have to think of Rory Miller's "drop step." This video isn't perhaps the best example. The one he does towards the end near to the camera is better. Right from when I first learned this method from him I though of Niseishi.

Iain Abernethy
Iain Abernethy's picture

Tau wrote:
I appreciate this is Nijushiho rather than Niseishi. I'm familiar more with the latter.

This is were Shotokan’s use of Japanese names / pronunciations gives them an edge. Say “Nijushiho” and everyone knows you are talking about the Shotokan version of the form (there are subtle variations across the various Shotokan groups, but the kata is relatively consistent). There are a few different versions using the “Niseishi” label though. For example:

 

 

 

And so on. Use “Nijushiho” and everyone knows you mean the kata as practised in Shotokan. “Niseishi” needs further clarification because the term covers many variations.

Tau wrote:
When it comes to pre-emption in this kata I have to think of Rory Miller's "drop step." This video isn't perhaps the best example. The one he does towards the end near to the camera is better. Right from when I first learned this method from him I thought of Niseishi.

I agree the arm motion is similar to what we see in some versions of the form. If we are being strict with terminology, then the “drop step” refers to the power generation method; not the arm motion. Jack Dempsy (boxing) is who I immediately think of because he defined “drop step” for modern boxers and martial artists. It may have been around in boxing (possibly fencing?) before him, but I’m not sure. Either way, pretty much everyone using the term these days gets it from Dempsy (I’m confident Rory does too) and uses in to reference to a controlled “forward fall” which happens due to the release of the lead leg. You can use drop step to crash in (as Rory shows in the video), but you can also use it to add power to a whole host of other things too.

All the best,

Iain