Video

Funakoshi’s Half-Wheel Throw on the Pads

This video shows a way to drill Funakoshi’s Half-Wheel Throw on the focus mitts. In order to practise karate as a holistic and practical system, we need to resurrect the throws that were a key part of “old school karate”. To understand our kata, we also need to appreciate the wide range of methods found within them. The traditional kata include throws, locks, trapping, chokes, strangles, etc. It is when people don’t appreciate this that we see kata reinterred to be just strikes, kicks and dysfunctional “blocks”. Karate is so much more.

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Punching an advancing target after throwing a kick

In this video, we look at an intermediate fighting pad drill. It’s not a self-defence drill because – while there is some cross over – the context and methodology is for one-on-one consensual fighting. The drill has us throw a punching combination into a high kick (always a good idea to have the hands set up kicks). As the kick lands, the pad-holder pushes forward. This simulates the idea of the kick being blocked and a counterpunch being thrown. The forward motion from the pad-holder forces the striker to punch as the leg is recovering.

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Suspension Training for Practical Karateka

A suspension trainer is a piece of kit that I think all martial artists should have. It effectively allows you to have an entire gym in your kit bag and it’s the only bit of kit I’ve used that comes close to the effects of weight lifting. Your bodyweight provides the resistance and you can quickly alter the length of the straps depending upon which exercise you want to do. A high-quality brand can be expensive, but you can get fully functional cheaper versions that will do the job just fine. A very versatile piece of kit that can be used in innumerable ways.

All the best,

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Naihanchi / Tekki Nidan with "Dirt" Added

In this video we explore some bunkai for the opening sequence of Tekki / Naihanchi Nidan. Once the techniques have been covered, the video then looks at how we should “add in the dirt” i.e. practise the methods of the kata in context. The emphasis is on applying the bunkai of the kata, in combination with other methods, in a dominating, free-flowing way in order to facilitate escape. This makes the practise of the bunkai more realistic and is a vital step along the way to live practise.

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Kururunfa Joint-Lock Takedown

In this video we look at a joint-lock takedown from Kururunfa kata. The “upper x-block” cuts in and bends the enemy’s arm, and then the turn and drop puts pressure on the shoulder which will force the enemy to the floor. As with all martial methods, great care needs to be taken in practise. Always train under the direct supervision of a suitably qualified and experienced person.

Thanks for the support of this channel!

All the best,

Iain

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Nijushiho / Niseishi Bunkai: Rising Elbow Sequence

This video looks at bunkai for the sequence in Nijushiho / Niseishi that begins with a rising elbow. That elbow is then followed by either a “lower block” and “hook punch”, or a “low punch” and “lower block”, depending on the style being practised. The video looks at bunkai for both variations.

While on the surface the two variations seem quite different, I would suggest that they are alternate illustrations of how the arm can be manipulated in order to further create and maintain a position of advantage.

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Nijuhachiho Bunkai (video)

Nijuhachiho is said to be an Okinawan kata based on White Crane Kung Fu. The version discussed in this video is the one taught by Hirokazu Kanazawa 10th dan. The name Nijuhachiho means “28 steps”. It is different from the kata Nipaipo that is practiced in Shito-Ryu. Nipaipo also translates as “28 steps”.

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Naihanchi / Tekki Sandan Opening Sequence (video)

This video shows bunkai for the opening sequence of Tekki Sandan / Naihanchi Sandan kata. The video also shows how the discrete motions can be combined together into a single drill.

I am of the view that the Nidan and Sandan versions show alternative expressions of the core principles of Naihanchi Shodan (the original stand-alone kata once simply known as “Naihanchi”). Here we see variations on the limb-control and trapping methods that are first introduced in Naihanchi Shodan / Tekki Shodan.

Thanks for your support of these videos!

All the best,

Iain

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Kushanku / Kanku-Dai / Kosokun Limb Control Drills (video)

This video shows limb-control drills (trapping, locking, gripping and re-directing) for the first quarter of Kushanku / Kanku-Dai / Kosokun. The video begins by showing the two core drills for the opening sequence and the following knife-hands. The video then goes on to explain how the methods in the drill should be varied and recombined in differing orders. The objective is the never the drill. The objective is to internalise the methods within the drill so they can be applied freely and effectively as the situation dictates.

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Tekki / Naihanchi with Kubotan (video)

In this video we look at how the kubotan can be used to augment methods found in Naihanchi / Tekki Shodan. The kubotan is a short staff which is often made into keyring for everyday carry. The legality of the kubotan is something you need to check in your locality. In the UK, you could not carry the kubotan in public. Section 1 of the Prevention of Crime Act 1953 prohibits the possession in a public place of an offensive weapon without lawful authority or excuse (potential use in self-defence is not considered a good reason / excuse).

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